10 More Reasons to Add Trees to Your Yard

10 More Reasons to Add Trees to Your Yard
By Nancy Penrose

Here are 10 more reasons to add trees to your yard.

Trees Improve City Climate: Trees play a crucial role in mitigating the “heat island” effect in urban areas, counteracting the elevated temperatures caused by thermal energy stored in materials like concrete, asphalt and steel. These heat islands can be 3 to 10 degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. The cumulative impact of a substantial tree cover helps reduce air temperatures by offering shade and enhancing humidity through moisture evaporation in dry climates.

Trees Improve the Air We Breathe: Trees play a vital role in purifying the air by absorbing carbon dioxide and filtering out pollutants such as ozone. They not only produce life-sustaining oxygen but also can alleviate asthma symptoms. According to a 2014 USDA Forest Service research study, the positive impact of trees on air quality prevents over 850 deaths and more than 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms each year.

Versatile Landscape Elements: Trees serve as integral components of the landscape, forming the structural basis for outdoor spaces. They can frame scenic views, act as focal points, define boundaries, offer privacy screens, and create outdoor rooms.

Wildlife Habitat: Trees function as habitats for various birds, mammals, and insects, providing shelter, nesting sites, food, perches, and residences.

Social and Emotional Value: Beyond their environmental contributions, trees establish a connection between people and nature, fostering a sense of well-being. They often become gathering spaces for social events like picnics, while children are captivated by the allure of climbing trees and rope swings.

Economic Stability Boost: The presence and condition of a community’s trees significantly influence the first impression for visitors. Studies indicate that trees contribute to economic stability by attracting businesses and tourists. Tree-lined streets encourage people to linger and shop for longer durations. Properties in wooded areas, whether apartments or offices, experience faster rentals, higher occupancy rates, and longer tenant retention. Workspaces surrounded by trees experience increased productivity and reduced absenteeism.

Biodiversity Support: Trees and plants form local ecosystems that offer habitat and sustenance for birds, animals, and other plants. They create microclimates that enable the growth of plant species not typically found in urban areas, contributing to overall biodiversity.

Benefits for Lawns and Plants: Tree shade slows water evaporation in lawns, providing shelter from intense sunlight and reducing water costs. This not only promotes a healthier lawn but also supports water conservation.

Shelter and Privacy: Tall trees not only offer aesthetic shade for yards but also act as natural shields against harsh winds. They create canopies and habitats for wildlife while providing privacy from neighboring properties.

Soil Health: Trees play a crucial role in preventing soil erosion by stabilizing soil on hillsides and near water bodies. Their leaves offer protection during heavy rains, encouraging water retention in the soil. Combining these benefits with proper watering practices enhances overall soil health.

Contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700 to find out which trees would make the best addition to your landscape.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Trees Can Make You Happier

By Nancy Penrose

I love trees and have been helping people add them to their landscapes in the greater Seattle area for 24 years.

Indeed, trees play a crucial role in our lives through various means. Their primary function involves producing the oxygen essential for our breathing while absorbing carbon dioxide. However, some scientific studies suggest that trees offer additional significant advantages. Here are some intriguing findings derived from recent research on how trees contribute to human well-being.

Trees contribute to a reduction in stress and an increase in restoration. One of the most extensively studied benefits of exposure to nature is its ability to alleviate stress, anxiety, and have better deep thought, with much of this research centered around forests.

In a recent study, 585 young adults from Japan shared their mood experiences after a 15-minute walk, either in an urban environment or a forest. The study covered 52 different locations across the country, with approximately a dozen participants walking in each area. In all instances, those walking in a forest reported lower levels of anxiety, hostility, fatigue, confusion, and depressive symptoms, while exhibiting higher levels of vigor compared to those walking in urban settings. These effects were particularly pronounced for individuals who started the test with higher anxiety levels.

“The psychological benefits of walking through forests are very significant, and forest environments are expected to have very important roles in promoting mental health in the future,” stated the authors of the study.

Certainly, additional research indicates that engaging in “forest bathing,” a deliberate practice of spending time in the woods, can assist in coping with the pressures and challenges of urban life.

In a recent study conducted in Poland, participants devoted 15 minutes to observing either a winter urban forest or an urban landscape devoid of trees. The winter forest featured trees with straight trunks and no leaves, and there was no vegetation beneath the trees—essentially lacking any greenery. Conversely, the urban landscape was comprised of only buildings and roads. Prior to and following the observation period, participants completed questionnaires assessing their moods and emotions. Those who looked at the winter forest reported significantly improved moods, more positive emotions, increased vigor, and a heightened sense of personal restoration compared to those observing the urban scene lacking any trees.

It is possible that some of these benefits are related to the impact of forests on our brains. A study revealed that individuals living near trees exhibited better “amygdala integrity,” signifying a brain structure better equipped to handle stressors.

These findings, along with previous research reviews, underscore how even brief periods spent in a forest can offer respite from our hectic lifestyles. And that can include your own backyard with landscape trees.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

8 Compelling Reasons to Add a Tree to Your Yard

By Nancy Penrose
Trees play a crucial role in our ecosystem, contributing significantly to our existence. They supply us with the essential oxygen needed for breathing, create habitats for wildlife, and contribute to our food sources. However, their importance extends even further. Explore these 8 compelling reasons why integrating trees into your landscaping is a wise decision.

  1. Enhancing property values. Boosting your home’s property value is a common desire. Incorporating trees and plants into your landscape can potentially increase property values by up to 20 percent, as per some estimates. This presents a favorable return on investment considering the minimal maintenance they require.
  2. Purifying the air. A single tree can absorb approximately 48 pounds of carbon dioxide annually and can sequester 1 ton of carbon dioxide by the age of 40. Moreover, trees filter odors and pollutants like nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and ozone, capturing particulates on their leaves and bark.
  3. Slowing water runoff. Planting trees can significantly reduce the risk of flash flooding. For instance, a fully grown Colorado Blue Spruce, whether cultivated or growing in the wild, can intercept over 1,000 gallons of water annually, aiding in recharging underground aquifers.
  4. Preventing soil erosion. The root system of trees binds the soil, and their leaves act as a protective barrier against wind and rain, effectively preventing soil erosion.
  5. Mitigating noise pollution. Strategically planted trees in neighborhoods or around homes can act as effective buffers against major noises, particularly beneficial for areas near freeways or airports.
  6. Cooling homes, streets, and cities. Trees can decrease city temperatures by up to 10°F by shading homes and streets, breaking up urban heat islands, and releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.
  7. Saving on energy costs. In addition to temperature regulation, well-placed trees can reduce homeowners’ energy bills by up to 25 percent, providing shade in the summer and windbreaks in the winter.
  8. Enhancing aesthetic appeal. Undeniably, trees contribute to the stunning natural landscape. Whether it’s the blossoming buds in spring or the vibrant fall foliage, trees serve as beautiful decorations both indoors and outdoors.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Nine More Great Evergreen Trees for Your Yard

By Nancy Penrose


Evergreen trees provide beauty to your landscape all year round. Here are nine great evergreen trees that will add to your property. Now is an ideal time to plant a new tree in your landscape.

Emerald Green Arborvitae
The Emerald Green Arborvitae is one of the most popular and dependable screening trees for our area. They are often planted in rows to create a ‘Natural’ barrier. The Emerald Green is a dense evergreen that maintains its deep green color all year. Because of its columnar growth habit, and limited spread, the Emerald Green is an appropriate selection for small planting spaces.

Giant Sequoia
Giant Sequoia’s are some of natures largest trees.  These trees are medium to fast growing and do best in sunny protected areas with well-draining soil. The benefits of these trees are numerous, but to name a few: they provide shade in urban landscapes, they can create a windbreak for wide open spaces, and house many varieties of birds.

Excelsa Cedar
Excelsa cedars offer a combination of beauty, durability, stability, and sustainability.  Excelsa’s have an aesthetic that fits most gardens and landscapes here in the Northwest, making them a good choice for either a stand-alone tree or planted closer to provide some privacy. They are known for their natural resistance to disease, rot, and insect damage. The Excelsa Cedar is a renewable resource, since they are primarily grown in managed forests, and they are a fast-growing tree.  Excelsa’s are widely used and a popular choice for good reason.

Alpine Fir
The foliage of Subalpine Fir turns up along its branches, similar to Noble Fir, but the needles are shorter and tend to be bluish green.  The form of the tree is “spire-like,” very pointy and narrow, an adaptation that reduces the amount of snow that can build up on its branches.  This is a great accent tree for smaller planting areas and surrounding ponds and rockeries.

Green Giant
Green Giant is a vigorously growing, pyramidal evergreen with rich green color that remains outstanding throughout the year. It has no serious pest or disease problems and has been widely grown and tested in commercial nursery production. The “Green Giant” is an excellent substitute for Leyland cypress.

Vanderwolf Pine
The Vanderwolf Pine is a large evergreen tree with a pyramidal shape. It has long blue/green needles that give it a unique appearance. They are drought tolerant trees making them a good choice for landscapes that have limited watering options. They are low maintenance, require minimal pruning once established, and are generally resistant to pests. They are valued for their drought tolerance, cold hardiness, low maintenance, and their ornamental qualities.

Schipka Laurel
Schipka laurels, often called Skip laurel, offer several benefits. They are densely leafed compact shrubs that work well for privacy screens, wind barriers, and hedges. Their thick foliage is lush and green year-round, which makes them a popular choice for privacy, or anyone looking for some added color in the winder months. In short, the Schipka laurels provide year round foliage, are fast growing, low maintenance, and work well in full sun or part shade.

Oregon Green Pine
The Oregon Green Pine is an attractive medium size evergreen with a pyramidal shape. They have a dark green needles that are dense and give them a vibrant appearance. They have silver/white candles in the spring that have a nice high contrast to the dark green needles.  The Oregon Green is a great tree for a full sun area that needs a little sound dampening, visual barrier, or for an ornamental addition to the landscape.

Leyland Cypress
The Leyland Cypress is an excellent choice for a fast-growing large screening tree. Its growth rate and mature size are often underestimated when it is young, as it can be thin in its early stages. Growing up to three to four feet each year the Leyland Cypress fills in quickly. The Leyland requires little maintenance as long as you have adequate space for the tree at maturity. Leyland Cypress can also be used as a hedge as they do tolerate shearing to control growth and overall size. Shearing to control growth will require long term and regular maintenance.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Preparing Your Trees for Winter

By Nancy Penrose

Essential Tips for a Healthy Season
Winter can be a challenging time for trees. The cold in the air and on the ground make it difficult for trees to flourish, and trees in poor health may not survive the season at all.

With the right preparation, you can ensure that your arboreal companions make it through the cold months thriving and ready to bloom in the spring. At Big Trees Inc., we understand the importance of safeguarding your trees during winter and are here to provide you with essential tips for a healthy season.

1. Assess Tree Health
Before you embark on your winter tree care journey, it’s crucial to assess the current health of your trees. Inspect them for any signs of disease, pest infestations, or structural weaknesses. Identify dead or damaged branches that may pose a risk during winter storms.

2. Pruning and Trimming
Pruning and trimming your trees before winter can help reduce the risk of branch breakage under the weight of snow and ice. Focus on removing weak or overgrown branches, ensuring a balanced and sturdy tree structure. Be sure to use proper pruning techniques to avoid causing harm. Pruning before winter arrives helps ensure trees are ready for the colder season.

3. Mulching and Insulation
Mulch is your tree’s best friend in winter. A layer of organic mulch around the base of your trees helps insulate the soil, providing a buffer against extreme temperature fluctuations. For young or fragile trees, consider adding insulating materials or tree guards for added protection.

4. Pest and Disease Management
Winter is not a reprieve from tree pests and diseases. In fact, some thrive in cold weather. Be vigilant for signs of infestation or infection and take preventive measures. Consult with a professional arborist if you suspect a problem that requires treatment.

5. Wrapping and Shielding
Shielding your trees from harsh winter elements is crucial. Tree wraps and shelters can help protect your trees from frost and reduce the risk of sunscald. Secure these protective measures before the first frost arrives.

6. Monitoring and Winter Care Plan
Your commitment to tree care doesn’t end with winter preparation. Regularly check on your trees throughout the season. Remove heavy snow loads gently to prevent branch breakage. Adjust mulch and insulation as needed. Create a winter care plan to address any issues that arise promptly.

Are Your Trees Ready?
By following these essential tips for preparing your trees for winter, you’ll set the stage for a healthy and vibrant springtime comeback. Remember that Big Trees Inc. is here to assist you every step of the way. Don’t hesitate to reach out for professional guidance and support in ensuring your trees thrive all year round.

For more details and advice on tree care, contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Essential Fall Tree Care Tips to Keep Your Trees Healthy and Vibrant

By Nancy Penrose

As the summer warmth begins to wane and the leaves start to turn brilliant shades of red, orange, and yellow, it’s a clear sign that fall is arriving. While fall might bring to mind images of pumpkin spice lattes and cozy sweaters, it’s also a crucial time to pay attention to the health of your trees. Proper fall tree care ensures that your trees remain vibrant and strong throughout the colder months and are ready to thrive when spring arrives once again. In this article, we’ll explore some essential fall tree care tips to help you keep your trees in excellent condition.

1. Raking and Leaf Removal
The sight of colorful leaves blanketing the ground is undoubtedly picturesque, but leaving too many leaves on the ground can have negative consequences for your trees and lawn. A thick layer of leaves can create a damp environment that promotes disease and inhibits healthy growth. Make sure to rake and remove fallen leaves regularly to prevent these issues.

2. Mulching
Applying a layer of mulch around the base of your trees is a great practice for fall tree care. Mulch helps retain moisture, regulates soil temperature, and suppresses weed growth. Apply a layer of mulch that is about 2-4 inches deep, making sure to leave a few inches of space around the tree trunk to prevent moisture buildup and potential rot.

3. Watering
While trees tend to require less water during the fall compared to the hot summer months, it’s still important to ensure they receive adequate hydration before the ground freezes. Trees need sufficient moisture to survive the winter and prepare for the spring growth season. Be sure to water your trees deeply but less frequently as the temperatures drop.

4. Pruning
Fall is an ideal time for pruning, as the trees are entering a period of dormancy. Pruning helps remove dead, damaged, or diseased branches, enhancing the overall health and appearance of your trees. Additionally, removing these branches can prevent them from falling and causing damage during winter storms. Always use proper pruning techniques and tools to avoid injuring the tree.

5. Inspect for Pests and Diseases
Perform a thorough inspection of your trees for any signs of pests or diseases. Fall is a crucial time to identify and address these issues before they have a chance to worsen over the winter. Look for abnormal growths, discoloration, or signs of infestation. If you’re unsure about a particular issue, consider consulting with an arborist for professional advice.

6. Protect Young Trees
Young and newly planted trees are particularly vulnerable to the harsh conditions of winter. Consider wrapping the trunks of young trees with burlap or tree wrap to prevent sunscald and frost cracks. This protection can also help keep rodents from gnawing on the bark during the colder months.

7. Fertilization
Fall is an optimal time to fertilize your trees, as they will absorb and store nutrients during the dormant season. A slow-release, balanced fertilizer can provide essential nutrients to support root growth and overall tree health. Consult with a professional or conduct a soil test to determine the specific nutritional needs of your trees.

For more details and advice on tree care, contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Summer Tree Care Tips

By Nancy Penrose

Proper care of your trees during the summer months results in a healthy landscape for your yard. Summer is a great time to follow these five tree care tips.

1. Mulching:
Mulching trees is an important action because it cuts down on weeds, stabilizes soil temperatures, and helps conserve soil moisture. It’s best to mulch trees with 3-4 inches of shredded hardwood mulch. Be sure to keep the mulch 4-6 inches away from the trunk.  Placing mulch all the way up to the trunk can suffocate the roots and promotes disease and insect problems.

2. Irrigation:
During the hot summer months, watering trees may be needed, especially if your trees are young or newly planted. Newly planted trees need an average of one inch of water per caliper (trunk diameter), per day. IE: a 4” caliper tree needs 4 gallons of slow drip per day.

3. Fertilization:
Another important step in caring for trees in the summer is making sure they have adequate nutrition to support leaf growth, and resist pests and diseases, and that means fertilizer. Trees growing in urban or suburban areas often need more fertilization than trees in rural areas.

4. Pruning:
While most tree trimming should happen during the dormant season, there are some times when summer tree pruning is necessary. Any diseased, dead, or damaged branches should be pruned out for the health of the tree and for safety reasons. Also, spring flowering trees are best pruned in the early summer, after they finish blooming.

5. Tree pest inspections:
Examine trees for pest infestations regularly throughout the summer. While most insects are not harmful to trees, discovering any potential tree pest problems early gives you a better chance of controlling them.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

 

Planting a Tree Could Help You Live Longer

By Nancy Penrose

In the urban landscape, trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. And of course trees take carbon dioxide in the air and convert it to oxygen, which we mammals kind of need for breathing.

But it also turns out that trees can help you live longer.

A recent research study conducted in Portland by the US Forest Service, found that in neighborhoods where a nonprofit was planting more trees, fewer people died.

Geoffrey Donovan, the Forest Service researcher who did the study, which was published in the December issue of the journal Environment International, stated  “Urban trees are an essential part of our public health infrastructure, and they should be treated as such.”

Green health care

For three decades, the Portland area nonprofit organization Friends of Trees planted nearly 50,000 oaks, dogwoods and other types of trees around the city. Between 1990 and 2019, Friends of Trees planted 49,246 street trees (and kept records of where they were planted and when). The research team looked at the number of trees planted in a given area, in the preceding 5, 10, or 15 years. They compared this information with death rates due to cardiovascular, respiratory, or non-accidental causes in that same area, using data from the Oregon Health Authority.

Using a mathematical model to remove factors such as race, income, age and education, the study found that for every 100 trees planted, there was approximately one fewer non-accidental death per year. So 50,000 trees planted equated to 500 fewer non-accidental deaths per year.

Yashar Vasef, executive director of Friends of Trees, which plants across six counties in Oregon and Washington, stated “Across the board, the benefits of trees are astounding. And they come at a lower cost than many other solutions.”

As the trees got older and taller, the mortality rates among nearby people went down, the study found.

Geoffrey Donovan from the US Forest Service stated “Bigger trees, bigger impact on mortality, which is what you would expect. Studies have found links between exposure to the natural environment and improved health in a wide range of different cities and countries. We certainly know that air pollution, stress, and sedentary behavior are bad for people no matter their race or socioeconomic status.”

The reverse, unfortunately, seems to be true, too. Mortality rates appear to go up in areas that lose tree cover.

In an earlier study, Donovan and his team saw an increase in deaths from cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illnesses in areas from Minnesota to New York that lost trees from a pest called the emerald ash borer.

More trees, fewer deaths

Another recent study published in the British medical journal The Lancet suggested that a third of deaths from a 2015 heat wave in Europe could have been prevented with 30% more tree cover.

There are several reasons trees could boost health, including better air quality and increased levels of oxygen, less stress, and increased physical activity among residents of tree-lined neighborhoods. The link between more trees and lessening death rates held in both already heavy tree population neighborhoods, which tend to be more prosperous, and neighborhoods with fewer trees, which tend to be poorer.

The US Forest Service study stopped short of saying there was a direct cause-and-effect relationship between trees and death rates. But the statistics are pretty convincing and make for a safe bet.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Plant a Tree for Arbor Day

By Nancy Penrose

National Arbor Day is celebrated every year on the last Friday in April; this year on April 28th. It is a civic holiday in Nebraska. Some other states have selected their own dates for Arbor Day. The usual observance of Arbor Day is to plant a tree. On the first Arbor Day, April 10, 1872, approximately one million trees were planted.

Spring is one of the best times of the year to plant a tree.

In case you need more reasons to plant a tree, here is a list:

Plant Trees in Memory

Memorial trees planted in your yard can serve as a lasting, meaningful tribute in honor of someone special. 

Plant Trees in Celebration

Plant Trees in Celebration of birthdays, anniversaries, new births, or any special occasion. By planting Trees in Celebration, you can honor your loved ones while caring about the environment and making your environment more green.

Live Longer

A recent study done by the US Forest Service found that in areas where a non-profit was planting thousands of oaks, dogwoods, and other trees in the Portland area, the rates of non-accidental deaths decreased by roughly 1 per year, per 100 trees planted. So plant a tree and you could live longer.

A More Beautiful and Healthier Environment

Trees take in carbon dioxide and give off oxygen that we need to breathe. Trees reduce the amount of storm water runoff, reducing erosion and pollution in our waterways and can reduce the effects of flooding. Trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. Many species of wildlife depend on trees for habitat. Trees provide food, protection, and homes for many birds and mammals.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

How Long Does It Take a Tree to Recover From Transplanting

Transplanting a tree can be a necessary step for a many reasons, such as if the tree is outgrowing its current location, or if it’s simply in the way of construction or new landscaping plans. The process of transplanting a tree can be quite traumatic for the tree, and it’s important to give it the time and care it needs to recover.

How long does it take a tree to recover from transplanting? The answer to this question can depend on a variety of factors, such as the size and species of the tree, the time of year it’s transplanted, the care it receives after transplanting, and the overall health of the tree.  In general, smaller trees are able to recover more quickly from transplanting than larger trees. This is because they have smaller root systems and require less energy to establish themselves in their new location. However, even a small tree can take several months to fully recover from transplanting.

For larger trees, the recovery process can take much longer. It’s not uncommon for a large tree to take two to three years to fully recover from transplanting. During this time, it’s important to provide the tree with plenty of water and nutrients, and to avoid disturbing the soil around its roots.

The time of year that a tree is transplanted can also have an impact on its recovery time. In general, the best time to transplant a tree is in the fall, winter or early spring, when the tree is dormant and the weather is cooler. This allows the tree to focus its energy on establishing new roots and adapting to its new environment, rather than on growing new leaves or flowers.

The aftercare provided after transplanting is also critical to the tree’s recovery. Newly transplanted trees require regular watering, especially during the first year after transplanting. The soil should be kept moist but not waterlogged, as excessive moisture can lead to root rot. In addition to watering, the tree should be fertilized and pruned as needed to promote healthy growth and development.

The overall health of the tree can impact its ability to recover from transplanting. If a tree is already stressed or diseased before it’s transplanted, it may take longer to recover or may not recover at all. In these cases, it’s important to consult with a professional arborist to determine whether transplanting is the best option, or if other measures should be taken to improve the tree’s health.  A tree may show signs of recovery within a few weeks to a few months after transplanting. New growth may appear, and the tree may begin to produce leaves or flowers. However, full recovery can take much longer, especially for larger trees. It may take several years for the tree to fully establish itself in its new location and resume normal growth and development.

While recovery time can range from several months to a few years, it is important to be patient and provide the necessary care and attention to ensure the tree has the best chance of thriving in its new location. By taking these steps, you can help ensure the health and vitality of your newly transplanted tree for years to come.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or  http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

 

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com